#NaPoWriMo (National Poetry Writing Month)

If it’s April, it’s NaPoWriMo, that is, National Poetry Writing Month, a month when poetry devotees (like me and many of you) commit to writing at least one poem per day.  There are several blogs, sites, etc., that offer daily prompts, and folks are free to go off on their own and write “as the spirit leads them,” as my mother would say.

This year I have been pretty much in the latter category, drawing inspiration from things, events, happenings in the immediate environment.  As it happens, early in the month I attended three events that have had a huge impact on my April writing.  The first one was a writing salon at a local art gallery, a short, three hour “class,” that looked at one piece of art from various perspectives and encouraged attendees to write about the experience. The second was a poetry reading at a local library by three sonnet writers, who read and spoke about the “sonnet” craft.  The third was a lunch time exhibition talk about a single piece of art, which became the basis for my daily poetry submissions.

So, to ease your suspense, I’ll cut right to the chase. I decided to try my hand at a “crown of sonnets,” also called a “corona.” All the sonnet writers I saw at the reading talked about it!  Then, I decided to base each unique sonnet on a piece of art, implementing the tools we used in the writing salon.  Finally, I decided to use as the art work a series of paintings used as illustrations for poetry, and the exhibition talk I attended provided such an example, a series of paintings by the famed Harlem Renaissance painter, Aaron Douglas, used to illustrate James Weldon Johnson’s “God’s Trombones, Seven Negro Sermons in Verse,” one of which was on exhibit.  You can find the original, in electronic edition with illustrations, here.

OK.  Here is the thing about a corona.  The final line of each poem becomes the first line of each succeeding poem, and the first line of the first, the final line of the last.  Additionally, I tried as closely as possible to make each final line align with a line from the actual original poetry that the art work illustrated.  Finally, because the example I saw in exhibition was the illustration for the final poem in the series, I worked my way through the original poems from back to front, giving the whole thing a slightly different twist.

Enough chat.  I have posted the whole crown of sonnets on my poetry blog here (but you have to look for it). Please check it out and let me know what you think.

Resources from today’s #critlib chat

#critlib chats are always so rich with resources.  Today’s was no exception. Below are some of the links, books. slideshows, etc. mentioned in tweets for future reference. (I have been wanting to do this for a long time!).

This list is by no means exhaustive. I just ran out of gas (and the basketball game came on. Go Heels!)

Links:

http://libraryjuicepress.com/reference-justice.php
https://www.haikudeck.com/critical-theory
http://incluseum.com/ (Museum critlib)
http://critlib.org/
https://www.zotero.org/groups/critlib
https://criticalischool.wordpress.com/reading-list  (U of Sheffield ISchool)
https://my.vanderbilt.edu/femped/
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1yCZ9HUO1XulJ507HP32DB6Z8zd5AI8ydMnwLRcrmv6M/edit#heading=h.p7h234rkcafj
https://museumsandrace2016.wordpress.com
http://redpincushion.us/blog/teaching-and-learning/not-yetness-and-learnification/
http://www.aauw.org/

Books, papers:

Informed Agitation: Library and Information Skills in Social Justice Movements and Beyond.  Morrone, ed.  Z716.4 .I55 2014

Revolting Librarians redux: radical librarians speak out.  Roberto, K. and West, J. eds.  Z665 .R44 2003

Meanderings, Musings, and Monsters, Too.  Raish, ed.  Z675.U5 R175 2003

Radical Cataloging: Essays at the Front.  Roberto, ed.  Z693 R33 2008

Elmborg, J. (2006). Critical Information Literacy: Implications for Instructional Practice. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 32(2), 192–199.

Doherty, J. (2007). No Shhing: Giving Voice to the Silenced: An Essay in Support of Critical Information Literacy. Library Philosophy and Practice (e-Journal).

Drabinski, E. (2013). Queering the Catalog: Queer Theory and the Politics of Correction. The Library Quarterly, 83(2), 94–111.

Critical Theory for Library and Information Science http://escholarship.org/uc/item/8dg5b2jr

Paulo Freire’s classic “Pedagogy of the Oppressed.”  LB880 .F731 1992

Ideas:

Public library critlib
More student rates for conferences
Gender identity and LCC/LCSH
Libtech accessibility critlib
#CritLAM thoughts
more #critlib chats hosted by grad students and recent LIS graduates
#critlib student chapters
Critical Theory
Critical Pedagogy

Jobs:
http://joblist.ala.org/jobseeker/job/27755524

Organizations:
http://radicalreference.info/nyc-radical-reference-collective-meetup-april-9-2016

Upcoming events:

http://www.lianza.org.nz/event/hikuwai-event-what-critical-librarianship#

http://openaccess.unt.edu/news/addition-program-discussion-inclusiveness-oa-community-and-impromptu-bofs
Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium

http://litwinbooks.com/2016colloquium.php

http://sjlseattle.org/ The first-annual Social Justice and Libraries Open Conference

https://www.facebook.com/events/663045767178341/ APR14
April #critlib Baltimore Meetup

http://2016lacunyinst.commons.gc.cuny.edu/