LSC 772 Marketing Libraries and Information Centers

LSC 772 final paper and appendix

RDMaxwell final LSC 772 Term Project Report

RDMaxwell LSC 772 Term Project appendixes

Maxwell take home final exam

SyllabusLSC772Spring14

THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA
SCHOOL OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE

LSC 772
MARKETING LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SERVICES
SPRING 2014
SYLLABUS, VERSION 0.1, DECEMBER 13

3 Credit Hours

Meetings: Tuesdays, 6:40 – 9:10 p.m. (Jan. 14, Jan. 21, Feb. 11, March 4, March 25, April 8, April 29)
Room: 117 Caldwell Hall

NOTE: This Syllabus is Subject to Change

Instructor: David Shumaker
E-mail: shumaker@cua.edu
Phone: 202-319-5551 Office: 455 LAW
Hours: By appointment.

Course Description
“The marketing concept holds that the key to achieving organizational goals consists of determining the needs and wants of target markets and delivering the desired satisfactions more effectively and efficiently than competitors.” – Philip Kotler.
This course offers an introduction to modern marketing concepts and their application in for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. It addresses the environment in which all types of libraries and information services operate, and provides the student with an opportunity to apply marketing concepts to an information services operation of the student’s choosing. It explores the question, “how can a library or information service determine the needs and wants of its target patrons, and go about satisfying them in such a way as to become (or remain) an information provider of choice?”
Instructional Methods
This course combines in-class lectures and workshops, online discussion, and extensive field work. There will be seven class meetings, three online classes using Blackboard discussions, and four weeks will be devoted to field projects.

Required Text
Kotler, Philip & Nancy Lee. (2007) Marketing in the Public Sector. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education / Wharton School Publishing.

Recommended Supplementary Readings
Andreasen, Alan R. & Philip Kotler. (2003) Strategic Marketing for Nonprofit Organizations. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
Beckwith, Harry. (1997) Selling the Invisible: A Field Guide to Modern Marketing. New York: Warner Books.
Heath, Chip & Dan Heath. (2007) Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die. New York: Random House.
Ries, Al & Jack Trout. (2001) Positioning: The Battle for Your Mind. Twentieth Anniversary Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill.
Walters, Suzanne. (2004) Library Marketing That Works! New York: Neal-Schuman. ISBN: 1-55570-473-5.
Other Required Readings
Aaker, J., & Smith, A. (2011). The power of storytelling: What nonprofits can teach the private sector about social media. McKinsey Quarterly, January 8, 2012. (Available: http://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Marketing/Strategy/The_power_of_storytelling_What_nonprofits_can_teach_the_private_sector_about_social_media_2740 ) Accessed Dec. 26, 2012. Registration required.

American Marketing Association. (2010) Statement of Ethics. Available: http://www.marketingpower.com/AboutAMA/Pages/Statement%20of%20Ethics.aspx (Accessed Dec. 13, 2013)

Berry, John N. (2012, Feb. 1) “Transformed by Teamwork.” Library Journal, p. 20-23.

Blakeman, Karen; Brown, Scott. (2010, Oct./Nov.) “Social Media: Essential for Research, Marketing, and Branding.” Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science & Technology 37(1), 47-50.

Chafkin, Max. (2012, Oct.) Starring Ben Silberman as the Pinup Kid. Fast Company, Issue 169, p. 90. Available: ALADIN.

Circle, A. and K. Bierman. (2009, June 15) “The House Brand.” Library Journal: 32-35. Available: ALADIN.

Divol, Roxane, D. Edelman, H. Sarrazin. (2012, April) Demystifying social media. McKinsey Quarterly. Available: https://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Demystifying_social_media_2958 (Registration required; accessed Jan. 3, 2013)

Farkas, Meredith. (2010, Jan./Feb.) “Brand Perception 2.0.” American Libraries 41(1/2): 35.

Foote, Carolyn. (2012, Sept./Oct.) Data delivery: Getting the story out. Internet@schools, p. 26-27.

Gaddis, S. (1998, June). How To Design Online Surveys. Training & Development 52(6): 67-71. Available: ALADIN.

Gallup Consulting. (2009) Customer Engagement: What’s Your Engagement Ratio? Washington DC: Gallup Consulting. http://www.gallup.com/file/strategicconsulting/157187/Customer%20Engagement%20Ratio%20Brochure.pdf (Accessed Jan. 3, 2013)

Goldstein, Evan R. (2011, Nov. 8) The Anatomy of influence. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Available: http://chronicle.com/article/The-Anatomy-of-Influence/129688/ (Accessed Dec. 26, 2012)

Harrysson, Martin, Metayer, Estelle, Sarrazin, Hugo. (2012, Nov.) How ‘social intelligence’ can guide decisions. McKinsey Quarterly. Available: https://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/How_social_intelligence_can_guide_decisions_3031 (Accessed Dec. 26, 2012; free registration may be required)

Hiller, S., & Self, J. (summer 2004). From measurement to management: Using data wisely for planning and decision-making. Library Trends, 53(1), 129.

Kho, Nancy Davis. (2011, June) “Social Media in Libraries: Keys to Deeper Engagement.” Information Today 28(6), 1.

Lee, D. (2004). “Market Research: Market Segmentation and Libraries.” Library Administration & Management 18(1): 47.

Levy, S. (2009, Nov.) “Who’s Running Twitter?” Wired 17(11): 146-151. Available: http://www.wired.com/images/press/pdf/twitter.pdf . (Accessed Jan. 3, 2013.)

Olson, C. A. (2002). “What’s in It for Them? Communicating the Value of Information Services.” Information Outlook 6(11): 18.

Schmidt, Aaron. (2012, Dec.) Looking at logos. Library Journal, p. 20.

Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. (2009, July 8) “Getting to ‘Wow’: Consumers Describe What Makes a Great Shopping Experience.” Knowledge@Wharton. Available: http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article.cfm?articleid=2275 (Accessed Jan. 3, 2013)

Required Technologies
Capabilities Required for Course Delivery and Student Participation: Blackboard; standard CUA software; CUA library and information system accounts; ability to use ALADIN digital library resources. Every student should have daily access to a computer and high speed internet access, and the ability to use Microsoft Word, Powerpoint, and Excel or equivalent tools.

Tools and Technologies Taught: This course includes the discussion and use of information technology in marketing, including Web 2.0 and social media tools.

Other materials (e.g. lab supplies, calculators) with specifics of what is needed and how to obtain
None.

Libraries
The CUA Libraries’ wide range of resources and services, including databases, online journals, and FAQs are on the main web site. For assistance on papers and assignments, consult the research guides or schedule an appointment with a subject librarian.

Course Goals
The goals of this course are to introduce the student to modern marketing concepts, explore the application of these concepts to libraries and information services of different types, and to provide the student with practical field experience in the application of marketing to a library or information service.

Goals for Student Learning
At the conclusion of this course, students should achieve the following learning objectives:
• Articulate and discuss the principles of modern marketing
• Develop marketing recommendations and a marketing plan for library and information services
• Perform marketing activities, including customer research, product and service development, and promotion of library and information services
• Evaluate marketing programs
Professional Standards Addressed
With respect to the curriculum objectives stated in Section II of the Standards for Accreditation of Master’s Programs in Library & Information Studies, 2008, this course addresses:
• II.3.1 … Development of library and information professionals who will assume an assertive role in providing services by educating students in the necessity, nature, and principles of marketing
• II..3.2 … An evolving body of knowledge that reflects the findings of basic and applied research from relevant fields by incorporating knowledge from the fields of business management and marketing
• II.3.4 … The needs of a diverse society including the needs of underserved groups and II.3.5 The needs of a rapidly changing … society by developing the philosophy and practice of customer-centered library and information services, and the concepts of customer group segmentation and customer research.

Course Requirements
Successful completion of this course requires the ability to work independently and creatively. Expectations include on-time delivery of assignments, work that meets or exceeds the standard for graduate-level programs, and regular, active participation in class mmetings, discussions, exercises, and activities. Students must have regular access and the ability to use computers, word processing and presentation software, email, CUA libraries and the ALADIN system, and the World Wide Web.

Assignments are due at the dates and times indicated in the schedule below. Unless prior permission is obtained, the grade for late assignments will be reduced by 4 points (out of 100) per day; however, any work not turned in on or before the date of the final exam will receive a zero grade. Grades are based on work submitted. Rewriting, resubmission, and extra credit are not allowed.
Assignments and their weighting in the overall course grade are:
1. Field Work Plan (10%) Using a template provided by the instructor, each student will complete a written plan for the course’s field work component. Plans will be evaluated for accurate use of concepts presented in class, clarity, completeness, and expressed relationship to the goals of the course.
2. Midterm Project Report (15%) Students will submit a written report on project status as of early March, with an updated project plan. Grades will be assigned based on appropriate use of marketing and project planning concepts presented in class (including online classes), clarity, challenge of the field work project, and expressed relationship to the goals of the course.
3. Class Participation (10%) There will be seven in-person class meetings, and three weeks of the class will be devoted to online discussion using Blackboard. Each student is expected to participate in all nine sessions by contributing fresh information as well as informed and thoughtful insights and commentary to the course’s shared knowledge base. During the four virtual class weeks, only students who post substantive comments, according to directions, during both the first and second halves of the virtual class period will be eligible for full credit.
4. Written Final Project Report (30%) Each student will prepare a final written report on the field work project. The report will evaluate accomplishments in relation to the project plan, provide a narrative account of the project work, and reflect on what the student learned from the project. Deliverables produced in the project may be included if appropriate and if the host permits. In addition to the written report, each student will post a report or presentation to the class Blackboard site, and lead an online discussion of it.
5. Final Project Presentation (10%) Each student will post a summary report (text or Powerpoint notes pages) and lead a discussion of the project. Presentations will be peer graded.
6. Final Exam (25%) There will be a take-home final exam.
Expectations and policies
Academic honesty: Academic honesty is expected of all CUA students. Faculty are required to initiate the imposition of sanctions when they find violations of academic honesty, such as plagiarism, improper use of a student’s own work, cheating, and fabrication.
The following sanctions are presented in the University procedures related to Student Academic Dishonesty (from http://policies.cua.edu/academicundergrad/integrityprocedures.cfm): “The presumed sanction for undergraduate students for academic dishonesty will be failure for the course. There may be circumstances, however, where, perhaps because of an undergraduate student’s past record, a more serious sanction, such as suspension or expulsion, would be appropriate. In the context of graduate studies, the expectations for academic honesty are greater, and therefore the presumed sanction for dishonesty is likely to be more severe, e.g., expulsion. …In the more unusual case, mitigating circumstances may exist that would warrant a lesser sanction than the presumed sanction.”
Please review the complete texts of the University policy and procedures regarding Student Academic Dishonesty, including requirements for appeals, at http://policies.cua.edu/academicundergrad/integrity.cfm and http://policies.cua.edu/academicundergrad/integrity.cfm.

Other Policies or Expectations:
Attendance and Participation: For in-person classes, attendance is expected. Should illness or unavoidable circumstances cause you to miss a class, you’re expected to communicate with the instructor beforehand if possible, or as soon afterward as you can. You’re also responsible for making up any missed work and making sure you have mastered the content of the missed session. For online classes, the requirements for participation will be stated as each class begins.
Communication with the Instructor: You’re encouraged to request a meeting with the instructor at any time you have questions about course material or administration. If the instructor requests a meeting with you, you’re expected to respond.
Accommodations for students with disabilities: Any student who feels s/he may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the instructor privately to discuss specific needs. Please contact Disability Support Services (at 202 319-5211, room 207 Pryzbyla Center) to coordinate reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities. To read about the services and policies, please visit the website: http://disabilitysupport.cua.edu .
Assessment Summary
All graded work will be given a numeric score between 0 and 100. Weighting of assignments will be:

Assignment Weight
Field Work Plan 10%
Midterm Project Report 15%
Class Participation (Online and In-person) 10%
Final Project Report (written) 30%
Final Project class presentation (peer graded) 10%
Final Exam 25%
Total 100%
Based on the weighted average of scores for individual factors, final letter grades will be assigned as follows:
93-100 A
91-92 A-
89-90 B+
82-88 B
80-81 B-
70-79 C
<70 F

University grades:
The University grading system is available at
http://policies.cua.edu/academicundergrad//gradesfull.cfm#II for undergraduates and http://policies.cua.edu/academicgrad//gradesfull.cfm#iii for graduate students. Reports of grades in courses are available at the end of each term on http://cardinalstation.cua.edu .

Course Schedule

Session No. / Date Topic Assignment
1.
Jan. 14

In-person class 1

Course Introduction

Survey of Marketing, Part 1:
Definition, The Marketing Mindset, The 4 P’s, Ethics Read: Kotler & Lee, Chapters 1-2; American Marketing Association
Term Project Assigned
2.
Jan. 21
In-person class 2

Survey of Marketing, Part 2 Read: Kotler & Lee, Chapters 3-5, 13
3.
Jan. 26 – Feb. 1 Project Work Week 1 Field work plans due Feb. 1, 11:59 p.m.
4.
Feb. 2-9
Online class 1
Marketing Research and “Perpetual Beta” Read: Kotler & Lee, Chapter 11; Gaddis; Harrysson; Lee
Graded Field work plans returned by Feb. 8
5.
Feb. 11 In-person class 3
Branding, Communicating, and Positioning Read: Kotler & Lee, Chapters 6, 7, 8; Circle; Foote; Goldstein; Olson; Schmidt

6.
Feb. 16-23 Project Work Week 2 Revised work plans due Feb. 23, 11:59 p.m. (if needed)
Feb. 25 Administrative Monday: No Class
7.
Mar. 4
In-person class 4
Social Media for Marketing, Part 1 Read: Kotler & Lee, Chapter 9

Mar. 11 No class – Spring Break
8.
Mar. 16-23
Online class 2
Partnerships for Social Marketing (Comps. March 21-23)
Read: Kotler & Lee, Chapter 10
Midterm Project Reports Due March 16, 11:59 p.m.
9.
Mar. 25
In person class 5
Social Media, Part 2 Read: Aaker; Chafkin; Divol; Levy
Graded Midterm Reports returned by March 24
10.
Mar. 30 –April 6 Project Work Week 3

11.
April 8 In-person class 6
Social Media, Part 3 Read: Berry, Blakeman, Farkas, Kho
12.
April 13-16
Online Class 3
Evaluation of Marketing Read: Kotler & Lee, Chapter 12; Gallup; Wharton School “Getting to Wow!”; Hiller & Self
13.
April 22-27 Project Work Week 4 Project Presentations due on Blackboard April 27, 11:59 p.m.
14.
April 29 In-person class 7
Project Presentations; Wrapup Exercise Project Final Reports due
Final Exam released at end of class
May 6 Take-home Final Exam Final Exam due Tuesday May 6, 7:45pm

THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA
SCHOOL OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE

LSC 772
MARKETING LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SERVICES
SPRING 2014
SYLLABUS, VERSION 0.1, DECEMBER 13

3 Credit Hours

Meetings: Tuesdays, 6:40 – 9:10 p.m. (Jan. 14, Jan. 21, Feb. 11, March 4, March 25, April 8, April 29)
Room: 117 Caldwell Hall

NOTE: This Syllabus is Subject to Change

Instructor: David Shumaker
E-mail: shumaker@cua.edu
Phone: 202-319-5551 Office: 455 LAW
Hours: By appointment.

Course Description
“The marketing concept holds that the key to achieving organizational goals consists of determining the needs and wants of target markets and delivering the desired satisfactions more effectively and efficiently than competitors.” – Philip Kotler.
This course offers an introduction to modern marketing concepts and their application in for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. It addresses the environment in which all types of libraries and information services operate, and provides the student with an opportunity to apply marketing concepts to an information services operation of the student’s choosing. It explores the question, “how can a library or information service determine the needs and wants of its target patrons, and go about satisfying them in such a way as to become (or remain) an information provider of choice?”
Instructional Methods
This course combines in-class lectures and workshops, online discussion, and extensive field work. There will be seven class meetings, three online classes using Blackboard discussions, and four weeks will be devoted to field projects.

Required Text
Kotler, Philip & Nancy Lee. (2007) Marketing in the Public Sector. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education / Wharton School Publishing.

Recommended Supplementary Readings
Andreasen, Alan R. & Philip Kotler. (2003) Strategic Marketing for Nonprofit Organizations. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
Beckwith, Harry. (1997) Selling the Invisible: A Field Guide to Modern Marketing. New York: Warner Books.
Heath, Chip & Dan Heath. (2007) Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die. New York: Random House.
Ries, Al & Jack Trout. (2001) Positioning: The Battle for Your Mind. Twentieth Anniversary Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill.
Walters, Suzanne. (2004) Library Marketing That Works! New York: Neal-Schuman. ISBN: 1-55570-473-5.
Other Required Readings
Aaker, J., & Smith, A. (2011). The power of storytelling: What nonprofits can teach the private sector about social media. McKinsey Quarterly, January 8, 2012. (Available: http://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Marketing/Strategy/The_power_of_storytelling_What_nonprofits_can_teach_the_private_sector_about_social_media_2740 ) Accessed Dec. 26, 2012. Registration required.

American Marketing Association. (2010) Statement of Ethics. Available: http://www.marketingpower.com/AboutAMA/Pages/Statement%20of%20Ethics.aspx (Accessed Dec. 13, 2013)

Berry, John N. (2012, Feb. 1) “Transformed by Teamwork.” Library Journal, p. 20-23.

Blakeman, Karen; Brown, Scott. (2010, Oct./Nov.) “Social Media: Essential for Research, Marketing, and Branding.” Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science & Technology 37(1), 47-50.

Chafkin, Max. (2012, Oct.) Starring Ben Silberman as the Pinup Kid. Fast Company, Issue 169, p. 90. Available: ALADIN.

Circle, A. and K. Bierman. (2009, June 15) “The House Brand.” Library Journal: 32-35. Available: ALADIN.

Divol, Roxane, D. Edelman, H. Sarrazin. (2012, April) Demystifying social media. McKinsey Quarterly. Available: https://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Demystifying_social_media_2958 (Registration required; accessed Jan. 3, 2013)

Farkas, Meredith. (2010, Jan./Feb.) “Brand Perception 2.0.” American Libraries 41(1/2): 35.

Foote, Carolyn. (2012, Sept./Oct.) Data delivery: Getting the story out. Internet@schools, p. 26-27.

Gaddis, S. (1998, June). How To Design Online Surveys. Training & Development 52(6): 67-71. Available: ALADIN.

Gallup Consulting. (2009) Customer Engagement: What’s Your Engagement Ratio? Washington DC: Gallup Consulting. http://www.gallup.com/file/strategicconsulting/157187/Customer%20Engagement%20Ratio%20Brochure.pdf (Accessed Jan. 3, 2013)

Goldstein, Evan R. (2011, Nov. 8) The Anatomy of influence. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Available: http://chronicle.com/article/The-Anatomy-of-Influence/129688/ (Accessed Dec. 26, 2012)

Harrysson, Martin, Metayer, Estelle, Sarrazin, Hugo. (2012, Nov.) How ‘social intelligence’ can guide decisions. McKinsey Quarterly. Available: https://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/How_social_intelligence_can_guide_decisions_3031 (Accessed Dec. 26, 2012; free registration may be required)

Hiller, S., & Self, J. (summer 2004). From measurement to management: Using data wisely for planning and decision-making. Library Trends, 53(1), 129.

Kho, Nancy Davis. (2011, June) “Social Media in Libraries: Keys to Deeper Engagement.” Information Today 28(6), 1.

Lee, D. (2004). “Market Research: Market Segmentation and Libraries.” Library Administration & Management 18(1): 47.

Levy, S. (2009, Nov.) “Who’s Running Twitter?” Wired 17(11): 146-151. Available: http://www.wired.com/images/press/pdf/twitter.pdf . (Accessed Jan. 3, 2013.)

Olson, C. A. (2002). “What’s in It for Them? Communicating the Value of Information Services.” Information Outlook 6(11): 18.

Schmidt, Aaron. (2012, Dec.) Looking at logos. Library Journal, p. 20.

Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. (2009, July 8) “Getting to ‘Wow’: Consumers Describe What Makes a Great Shopping Experience.” Knowledge@Wharton. Available: http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article.cfm?articleid=2275 (Accessed Jan. 3, 2013)

Required Technologies
Capabilities Required for Course Delivery and Student Participation: Blackboard; standard CUA software; CUA library and information system accounts; ability to use ALADIN digital library resources. Every student should have daily access to a computer and high speed internet access, and the ability to use Microsoft Word, Powerpoint, and Excel or equivalent tools.

Tools and Technologies Taught: This course includes the discussion and use of information technology in marketing, including Web 2.0 and social media tools.

Other materials (e.g. lab supplies, calculators) with specifics of what is needed and how to obtain
None.

Libraries
The CUA Libraries’ wide range of resources and services, including databases, online journals, and FAQs are on the main web site. For assistance on papers and assignments, consult the research guides or schedule an appointment with a subject librarian.

Course Goals
The goals of this course are to introduce the student to modern marketing concepts, explore the application of these concepts to libraries and information services of different types, and to provide the student with practical field experience in the application of marketing to a library or information service.

Goals for Student Learning
At the conclusion of this course, students should achieve the following learning objectives:
• Articulate and discuss the principles of modern marketing
• Develop marketing recommendations and a marketing plan for library and information services
• Perform marketing activities, including customer research, product and service development, and promotion of library and information services
• Evaluate marketing programs
Professional Standards Addressed
With respect to the curriculum objectives stated in Section II of the Standards for Accreditation of Master’s Programs in Library & Information Studies, 2008, this course addresses:
• II.3.1 … Development of library and information professionals who will assume an assertive role in providing services by educating students in the necessity, nature, and principles of marketing
• II..3.2 … An evolving body of knowledge that reflects the findings of basic and applied research from relevant fields by incorporating knowledge from the fields of business management and marketing
• II.3.4 … The needs of a diverse society including the needs of underserved groups and II.3.5 The needs of a rapidly changing … society by developing the philosophy and practice of customer-centered library and information services, and the concepts of customer group segmentation and customer research.

Course Requirements
Successful completion of this course requires the ability to work independently and creatively. Expectations include on-time delivery of assignments, work that meets or exceeds the standard for graduate-level programs, and regular, active participation in class mmetings, discussions, exercises, and activities. Students must have regular access and the ability to use computers, word processing and presentation software, email, CUA libraries and the ALADIN system, and the World Wide Web.

Assignments are due at the dates and times indicated in the schedule below. Unless prior permission is obtained, the grade for late assignments will be reduced by 4 points (out of 100) per day; however, any work not turned in on or before the date of the final exam will receive a zero grade. Grades are based on work submitted. Rewriting, resubmission, and extra credit are not allowed.
Assignments and their weighting in the overall course grade are:
1. Field Work Plan (10%) Using a template provided by the instructor, each student will complete a written plan for the course’s field work component. Plans will be evaluated for accurate use of concepts presented in class, clarity, completeness, and expressed relationship to the goals of the course.
2. Midterm Project Report (15%) Students will submit a written report on project status as of early March, with an updated project plan. Grades will be assigned based on appropriate use of marketing and project planning concepts presented in class (including online classes), clarity, challenge of the field work project, and expressed relationship to the goals of the course.
3. Class Participation (10%) There will be seven in-person class meetings, and three weeks of the class will be devoted to online discussion using Blackboard. Each student is expected to participate in all nine sessions by contributing fresh information as well as informed and thoughtful insights and commentary to the course’s shared knowledge base. During the four virtual class weeks, only students who post substantive comments, according to directions, during both the first and second halves of the virtual class period will be eligible for full credit.
4. Written Final Project Report (30%) Each student will prepare a final written report on the field work project. The report will evaluate accomplishments in relation to the project plan, provide a narrative account of the project work, and reflect on what the student learned from the project. Deliverables produced in the project may be included if appropriate and if the host permits. In addition to the written report, each student will post a report or presentation to the class Blackboard site, and lead an online discussion of it.
5. Final Project Presentation (10%) Each student will post a summary report (text or Powerpoint notes pages) and lead a discussion of the project. Presentations will be peer graded.
6. Final Exam (25%) There will be a take-home final exam.
Expectations and policies
Academic honesty: Academic honesty is expected of all CUA students. Faculty are required to initiate the imposition of sanctions when they find violations of academic honesty, such as plagiarism, improper use of a student’s own work, cheating, and fabrication.
The following sanctions are presented in the University procedures related to Student Academic Dishonesty (from http://policies.cua.edu/academicundergrad/integrityprocedures.cfm): “The presumed sanction for undergraduate students for academic dishonesty will be failure for the course. There may be circumstances, however, where, perhaps because of an undergraduate student’s past record, a more serious sanction, such as suspension or expulsion, would be appropriate. In the context of graduate studies, the expectations for academic honesty are greater, and therefore the presumed sanction for dishonesty is likely to be more severe, e.g., expulsion. …In the more unusual case, mitigating circumstances may exist that would warrant a lesser sanction than the presumed sanction.”
Please review the complete texts of the University policy and procedures regarding Student Academic Dishonesty, including requirements for appeals, at http://policies.cua.edu/academicundergrad/integrity.cfm and http://policies.cua.edu/academicundergrad/integrity.cfm.

Other Policies or Expectations:
Attendance and Participation: For in-person classes, attendance is expected. Should illness or unavoidable circumstances cause you to miss a class, you’re expected to communicate with the instructor beforehand if possible, or as soon afterward as you can. You’re also responsible for making up any missed work and making sure you have mastered the content of the missed session. For online classes, the requirements for participation will be stated as each class begins.
Communication with the Instructor: You’re encouraged to request a meeting with the instructor at any time you have questions about course material or administration. If the instructor requests a meeting with you, you’re expected to respond.
Accommodations for students with disabilities: Any student who feels s/he may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the instructor privately to discuss specific needs. Please contact Disability Support Services (at 202 319-5211, room 207 Pryzbyla Center) to coordinate reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities. To read about the services and policies, please visit the website: http://disabilitysupport.cua.edu .
Assessment Summary
All graded work will be given a numeric score between 0 and 100. Weighting of assignments will be:

Assignment Weight
Field Work Plan 10%
Midterm Project Report 15%
Class Participation (Online and In-person) 10%
Final Project Report (written) 30%
Final Project class presentation (peer graded) 10%
Final Exam 25%
Total 100%
Based on the weighted average of scores for individual factors, final letter grades will be assigned as follows:
93-100 A
91-92 A-
89-90 B+
82-88 B
80-81 B-
70-79 C
<70 F

University grades:
The University grading system is available at
http://policies.cua.edu/academicundergrad//gradesfull.cfm#II for undergraduates and http://policies.cua.edu/academicgrad//gradesfull.cfm#iii for graduate students. Reports of grades in courses are available at the end of each term on http://cardinalstation.cua.edu .

Course Schedule

Session No. / Date Topic Assignment
1.
Jan. 14

In-person class 1

Course Introduction

Survey of Marketing, Part 1:
Definition, The Marketing Mindset, The 4 P’s, Ethics Read: Kotler & Lee, Chapters 1-2; American Marketing Association
Term Project Assigned
2.
Jan. 21
In-person class 2

Survey of Marketing, Part 2 Read: Kotler & Lee, Chapters 3-5, 13
3.
Jan. 26 – Feb. 1 Project Work Week 1 Field work plans due Feb. 1, 11:59 p.m.
4.
Feb. 2-9
Online class 1
Marketing Research and “Perpetual Beta” Read: Kotler & Lee, Chapter 11; Gaddis; Harrysson; Lee
Graded Field work plans returned by Feb. 8
5.
Feb. 11 In-person class 3
Branding, Communicating, and Positioning Read: Kotler & Lee, Chapters 6, 7, 8; Circle; Foote; Goldstein; Olson; Schmidt

6.
Feb. 16-23 Project Work Week 2 Revised work plans due Feb. 23, 11:59 p.m. (if needed)
Feb. 25 Administrative Monday: No Class
7.
Mar. 4
In-person class 4
Social Media for Marketing, Part 1 Read: Kotler & Lee, Chapter 9

Mar. 11 No class – Spring Break
8.
Mar. 16-23
Online class 2
Partnerships for Social Marketing (Comps. March 21-23)
Read: Kotler & Lee, Chapter 10
Midterm Project Reports Due March 16, 11:59 p.m.
9.
Mar. 25
In person class 5
Social Media, Part 2 Read: Aaker; Chafkin; Divol; Levy
Graded Midterm Reports returned by March 24
10.
Mar. 30 –April 6 Project Work Week 3

11.
April 8 In-person class 6
Social Media, Part 3 Read: Berry, Blakeman, Farkas, Kho
12.
April 13-16
Online Class 3
Evaluation of Marketing Read: Kotler & Lee, Chapter 12; Gallup; Wharton School “Getting to Wow!”; Hiller & Self
13.
April 22-27 Project Work Week 4 Project Presentations due on Blackboard April 27, 11:59 p.m.
14.
April 29 In-person class 7
Project Presentations; Wrapup Exercise Project Final Reports due
Final Exam released at end of class
May 6 Take-home Final Exam Final Exam due Tuesday May 6, 7:45pm

One thought on “LSC 772 Marketing Libraries and Information Centers

  1. Pingback: Ray's Atlas of the New

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